Bioglane studies presence of D-fagomine in the human diet

Bioglane studies presence of D-fagomine in the human diet

A diet rich in buckwheat products would provide a daily amount of D-fagomine that may in part explain the beneficial properties traditionally attributed to buckwheat consumption.

Previous scientific work by Bioglane, a Barcelona-based biotech company, shows that D-fagomine lowers the blood glucose peak after the ingestion of refined carbohydrates and may help to regulate intestinal microbiota [British Journal of Nutrition 2012, 107, 1739–1746].

D-fagomine is a minor component of buckwheat seeds and is present in human diet through a large number of traditional foods all around the North Hemisphere. This ancient grain is used to prepare different foodstuffs including noodles (Japanese soba, Korean makguksu and Italian pizzoccheri), groats (Polish Kasha), pancakes (French crêpes de Bretagne, Slavic blinis and North American ployes), boiled flour (Italian polenta, and Slovenian and Croatian žganci),fried dough (Spanish farinetes de fajol from Catalonia), beer, cookies, bread and a myriad of other foodstuffs.

Now, Bioglane together with the Spanish Research Council (IQAC and CSIC/UAB Proteomics Lab), Parc Científic de Barcelona (Fundación para la Investigación Nutricional) and Las Palmas GC University presents a new study that analyses the D-fagomine content in buckwheat-based foodstuffs and estimates the amount of D-fagomine consumed per day by a population following a diet that incorporates buckwheat-based products.

This study has been published online (DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2012.09.038) in the scientific journal Food Chemistry, an international journal with one of the highest impact factor in the Food Science & Technology category of the Journal of Citation Reports (6th of 128 ).

The researchers determined D-fagomine in traditional buckwheat-based foodstuffs. They found amounts ranging from 1 to 25 milligrams of D-fagomine per kilogram. Buckwheat bread and homemade cookies have the highest content (15 to 25 milligrams of D-fagomine per kilogram).

The intake of D-fagomine in humans that incorporate buckwheat-based products in their diet was estimated by using a population-based cross-sectional nutrition survey carried out in Catalonia, NE Spain in 2002 to 2003 (ENCAT 2002-03): a total of 2158 individuals (995 men and 1163 women) aged 10 to 80 years were interviewed. The diet would include pasta and groats (boiled), bread, and sprouts as the main source of carbohydrates, buckwheat beer, and other buckwheat products such as cookies, pastry and cakes.

The estimated total intake of D-fagomine resulting from a diet that includes such foodstuffs would be between 3 and 17 milligrams per day, amounts of the same order of magnitude as the active dose.

In the same study, the researchers found that D-fagomine is stable during different food elaboration processes including baking, frying, boiling and fermentation.

A diet rich in buckwheat products would provide a daily amount of D-fagomine that may in part explain the beneficial properties traditionally attributed to buckwheat consumption.

 

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