Cargill to build canola refinery in Saskatchewan

Cargill to build canola refinery in Saskatchewan

Refinery is expected to be completed in time for the 2014-2015 canola harvest.

Cargill announced plans to construct a world scale canola refinery at its Clavet, Saskatchewan, canola processing facility. The refinery is expected to be completed in time for the 2014-2015 canola harvest.

“We are delighted to make this announcement and confirm our commitment to provide food-grade canola oil to Cargill’s customers throughout Canada and the United States. It represents the first investment of this kind for Cargill in Canada and is one further step in the creation of Clavet as a major centre for value added processing,” says Gonzalo Petschen, president of Cargill’s Dressing, Sauces and Oils division. The facility will employ the latest in design for both efficient and food-safe production of canola oil for the North American market.

“This builds on the original vision of Clavet being an integrated canola processing hub for Cargill and for Saskatchewan,” said Ken Stone, commercial manager, Cargill Grains and Oilseeds. This significant investment in the canola business reflects our commitment to the Province and the canola producers of Saskatchewan. “This ensures our ability to provide value to our growers and our oil customers in the years ahead,” adds Stone.

The Clavet canola crush facility was first built in 1996 and later expanded in 2009. It currently is the largest canola processing facility in Canada and capable of processing 1.5 million metric tonnes per year serving the canola growers of Saskatchewan- Canada’s largest canola producing province. This latest investment by Cargill complements the Cargill specialty canola research facility in Aberdeen and the Cargill AgHorizon farm service centres throughout the Province.

The refinery will add up to 30 additional jobs and boost the total Cargill Clavet complex close to 200 employees.

Further details on the design of the new facility will be announced in the upcoming months.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish