Consumer Reports: Nordic Naturals Ultimate Omega did not fail freshness test

Consumer Reports: Nordic Naturals Ultimate Omega did not fail freshness test

Consumer Reports has retracted their statement that Nordic Naturals Ultimate Omega failed their test for freshness.

In the January issue of Consumer Reports, in circulation now, an article, Fish-oil pills vs. claims, claims to reveal test results for 15 top-selling fish oil brands. The article claims thattest results reveal that 6 fell short on quality. Specifically, Consumer Reports asserts that there is evidence that Nordic Naturals® award-winning Ultimate Omega® 180 count naturally-flavored lemon soft gels contained “elevated levels of compounds that indicate spoilage.” Because Consumer Reports’ conclusion was uninformed and incomplete, customers may be led to question our product even though it passed all other tests for quality that Consumer Reports included in their review.

In an attempt to clarify confusion that has ensued in the media and with customers as a result of this article, Consumer Reports has issued the following correction.

Correction: The version of this story that appears in the January 2012 issue of Consumer Reports magazine reported that our tests found "elevated levels of compounds that indicate spoilage" in samples of Nordic Naturals Ultimate Omega® 1000 mg (180 count). Just as digital versions of the story were being readied for publication, however, the company challenged our conclusion based on the fact that its product includes natural lemon oil as a flavoring. Upon further review, we have found that the industry-standard spoilage test weused cannot reliably detect spoilage in products with lemon oil, and we could not identifyany current well-established methodology for doing so. (Nordic Naturals was the only lemon-flavored product in our study.) Because the spoilage test cannot be applied, we couldn't keep Nordic Naturals Ultimate Omega in a report that required all products to undergo all tests. Nordic Naturals did meet every other quality measure in our study. The pills, which cost about 67 cents per day, or $243 per year, contained their labeled amount of omega-3 fatty acids and met other U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP) and European Union standards, including those for contaminants such as lead, mercury and dioxins. They alsomet the stricter California Proposition 65 standard for total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). A correction will appear in the February 2012 issue of Consumer Reports magazine.

To learn more visit


Hide comments


  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.