CRN Expands Outreach Efforts to Congress

- Urges Congress to Oppose Durbin Bill; Support Harkin/Hatch Bill -

WASHINGTON, D.C., August 21, 2003 - The Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN) and its member companies are implementing a congressional outreach campaign that opposes The Dietary Supplement Safety Act (S 722), sponsored by Sen. Richard Durbin (D-IL), and supports The DSHEA Full Implementation and Enforcement Act of 2003 (S 1538), sponsored by Sen. Tom Harkin (D-IA) and co-sponsored by Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT).

The action-oriented approach centers on a nationwide letter writing and telephone campaign beginning with CRN member companies who will then inform their customers, employees, and extensive direct seller networks.

The messages serve to remind Senators that the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) is a workable law that requires fuller enforcement, and that introduction of any new legislation would unnecessarily impair recent efforts by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), under the leadership of Commissioner Mark McClellan, M.D., to properly implement the law already on the books.

According to CRN President Annette Dickinson, Ph.D., "CRN's effort is part of an industry-wide campaign to urge Congress not to reinvent the wheel. For the first time, we have an FDA Commissioner who is committed to implementing DSHEA instead of fighting it. He is making great strides and the agency should be allowed to continue its work. "We have been in discussions with other industry groups and CRN's activities bring an added dimension and additional resources that will complement the work already underway."

Tagged with the message "DSHEA: It Makes Sense...Let's Make it Work!," the campaign is compatible with CRN's on-going outreach efforts to Congress which include monthly mailings to all Congressional offices and an advertising campaign in The Hill and Roll Call, Capitol Hill publications.


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