Dairy adulteration screening technology in development

Dairy adulteration screening technology in development

Aim is to create infrared-based methods that can detect fraudulent adulteration at the earliest stages of the dairy supply chain.

The development of a new screening system to detect possible adulteration of milk is underway, says IDF expert Dr. Steve Holroyd (NZ) at the annual IDF/ISO Analytical Week in Tel Aviv, Israel. Dr. Holroyd presented a cross-company initiative during the midweek symposium on June 6.

The aim is to create infrared-based methods that can detect fraudulent adulteration across the milk supply chain. The new approach enables dairy companies to screen milk for a range of known adulterants, but is also capable of indicating whether unknown adulterants might be present. The system would allow detection at the earliest stages of the supply chain.

This presentation comes as a follow-up to the recent article on FTIR technology for routine milk screening published in the IDF Bulletin ‘Integrated Supply Chain Management’. Dr. Jaap Evers, Chair of the IDF Methods Standards Steering Group, said: “In contrast to existing technology, infrared methods will allow rapid screening of milk thus allowing a prompt response to safeguard consumer health. This initiative is a real step forward in the prevention of milk adulteration.”

The IDF/ISO Analytical Week also featured presentations on the Israeli dairy sector, workshops and a visit to the largest dairy farm in the center of Israel. Over 100 participants attended the event, joined by 120 local participants for the symposium, including representatives of the Israeli Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Agriculture.

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