Dark roasted coffee improves human antioxidant status

Dark roasted coffee improves human antioxidant status

Research published in Molecular Nutrition & Food Research examined the effects of dark roasted coffee versus light roasted coffee on the body's oxidative defense mechanisms.


From the American Herbal Products Association (AHPA):

"This study examined the effects in human subjects on the body's oxidative defense mechanisms from consumption of dark roasted coffee versus light roasted coffee. Dark roasted coffee is rich in N-methylpyridinium ions that are created in the roasting process and low in chlorogenic acids, which are abundant in lightly roasted beans."

From the Molecular Nutrition & Food Research: Dark Roasted Coffee Improves Human Antioxidant Status


Recent results from prospective cohort studies have shown that moderate coffee consumption is associated with a reduced risk for diabetes mellitus type II or Alzheimer's disease. Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases, antioxidants in coffee might contribute to this risk reduction. We aimed at elucidating whether a dark roast coffee beverage (CB) rich in N-methylpyridinium ions (NMP: 785 μmol/L) and low in chlorogenic acids (CGA: 523 μmol/L) has stronger antioxidant effects on human erythrocytes than a CB prepared from a light roast with opposite proportions (CGA: 4538 μmol/L; NMP: 56 μmol/L). Following a 2-wk wash out period, 500 mL of the respective CB was administered to 30 subjects daily for 4-wk. Blood and spot urine samples were collected at the beginning and at the end of each intervention. Intake of the dark roast CB most effectively improved the antioxidant status of erythrocytes: superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity decreased by 5.8 and 15%, respectively, whereas tocopherol and total glutathione concentrations increased by 41 and 14%, respectively. Furthermore, administration of the NMP-rich CB led to a significant body weight reduction in pre-obese subjects, whereas the CGA-rich CB did not.

The links above are provided as a convenience, however, web pages are often updated by their host sites and this link may not remain active. AHPA gathers information from many organizations. Some sites require you to register in order to read articles.


Hide comments


  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.