Herbalife Provides Research Grant to University of Mississippi

LOS ANGELES, Aug 06, 2007 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- Herbalife Ltd. (HLF) , a global nutrition and direct-selling company, has awarded a research grant to the National Center for Natural Products Research at the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy. The grant will allow NCNPR scientists to identify and study the biologically active chemicals found in botanicals, which may be used in the development of future dietary supplements and skin care products for Herbalife.

Herbalife is advancing dietary supplement research and development through several venues. In 2003, Herbalife awarded a grant to the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Center for Human Nutrition to establish the Mark Hughes Cellular and Molecular Nutrition Laboratory to further advance research in human nutritional science. Additionally, the company recently opened a new 10,000 sq ft Product and Science Center at its South Bay facility in Torrance, Calif., led by Steve Henig, Ph.D., Herbalife's chief scientific officer.

Established in 1993, NCNPR is the nation's only university research center devoted to improving human health and agricultural productivity through the discovery, development and commercialization of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and dietary supplements derived from plants, marine organisms and other natural products.

About Herbalife Ltd.
Herbalife ( http://www.herbalife.com) is a global network marketing company that sells weight-management, nutritional supplements and personal care products to support a healthy lifestyle. Herbalife products are sold in 65 countries through a network of more than 1.6 million independent distributors. The company supports the Herbalife Family Foundation ( http://www.herbalifefamily.org) and its Casa Herbalife program to bring good nutrition to children. Please visit Investor Relations ( http://ir.herbalife.com) for additional financial information.

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