JAMA article claims energy drinks not regulated by FDA

JAMA article claims energy drinks not regulated by FDA

Journal has published three articles on energy drinks. But is one of them inherently false?

The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), which bills itself as "the most widely circulated medical journal in the world," on Dec. 19 released three free-access online articles related to energy drinks: risks when mixed with alcohol, caffeine-related adverse effects, and one titled "Energy Drinks," which is posted on the JAMA Patient Page. The patients' article includes information on the caffeine content of beverages and other products, ingredients, and health risks. Of note, a PDF of the patient article includes a stamp with an image that states "Copy for your patients," an effort by the journal to drive communication to consumers through their doctors. Of greater interest, however, is a statement in the patient article: "Energy drinks are not regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration." This, of course, is patently false as energy drinks, whether sold as foods or dietary supplements, are well regulated by FDA.

The Journal of the American Medical Association
December 19, 2012

“Energy Drinks”

Beverages called energy drinks are popular, especially with teenagers and young adults. These energy drinks are advertised to give individuals a higher energy level, to make a person feel more awake, and to boost attention span.

Energy drinks are marketed in different serving sizes and have varying amounts of caffeine. Sodas (also known as pop, colas, or soft drinks) may contain sugar and caffeine, although most sodas contain less caffeine than energy drinks on an ounce-by-ounce basis. As a comparison, an 8-oz cup of coffee has about 100 mg of caffeine. The January 16, 2013, issue of JAMA contains 2 articles discussing the harms associated with energy drinks.

Read more

The Journal of the American Medical Association
December 19, 2012
“Energy Drinks and Caffeine-Related Adverse Effects”

In 1911, under authority granted by the recently enacted Food and Drug Act, US agents seized 40 kegs and 20 barrels of Coca-Cola syrup in Chattanooga, Tennessee.1- 2 The group, led by chief chemist Harvey Wiley, considered the caffeine in Coca-Cola to be a significant public health hazard (both cocaine and alcohol had been removed from the recipe in the previous decade). The case continued for years. Eventually Coca-Cola decreased the caffeine content in this product and legal action was dropped.3

In 2012, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is again investigating a caffeine-containing product, the "energy drink," because of safety concerns. Several types of these caffeinated drinks are linked to unexpected deaths in apparently healthy persons, raising calls for closer scrutiny and possible regulation. Drinks containing both caffeine and alcohol were considered unsafe by the FDA in 2010 because the caffeine obscured "some of the sensory cues individuals might normally rely on to determine their level of intoxication."

Read more

The Journal of the American Medical Association
December 19, 2012
“Risks of Energy Drinks Mixed with Alcohol”

The energy drink market is a multibillion-dollar industry that uses aggressive and innovative marketing strategies to target teens and young adults. Consequently, 31% of young teens and 34% to 51% of 18- to 24-year-olds report regular consumption of these products.1

Energy drinks contain caffeine and often other substances such as guarana (containing guaranine, similar to caffeine), taurine (an amino acid), and sugar derivatives. The primary active ingredient is caffeine, usually with 80 to 141 mg of caffeine per 8 oz (equivalent to a 5-oz cup of coffee or 2 cans of soda).

Read more

 

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish