LIRMOI-project puts Denmark at the forefront of global resveratrol research

Several universities and Danish biotech company Fluxome A/S have joined forces to advance the use of resveratrol in humans from basic science into clinical settings and consumer acceptance

Aarhus University, Aarhus University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, Roskilde University, Pennsylvania State University, and Danish biotech company Fluxome A/S have joined forces to advance the use of resveratrol in humans from basic science into clinical settings and consumer acceptance. The research project lead by Dr. Steen Bønløkke Pedersen from Aarhus University will span over 5 years and will have 6 PhD students attached. Focus will be on the investigation of resveratrol on management of metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, and inflammation in humans.

A DKK 19.5 mil (USD 3.4 mil) grant for the LIRMOI-project (Long-term Investigation of Resveratrol on Management of Metabolic syndrome, Osteoporosis and Inflammation, and Identification of plant derived anti-inflammatory compounds) by the Danish Council for Strategic Research puts Denmark on the forefront of global resveratrol research. The LIRMOI-project is one of the largest human studies of its kind and will provide valuable information on the long-term effects of resveratrol in humans.

The project will advance knowledge in the field of inflammation and its consequences. It will constitute a key building block as a Centre of Excellence for resveratrol and other new anti-inflammatory compounds putting Denmark on the world map in this field. Besides type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and non-alcoholic fatty liver, other diseases associated with low-grade inflammation such as cancer, asthma, and psoriasis will be included in a future Centre of Excellence.

Provided resveratrol can help prevent diseases associated with obesity, consequences both at individual level and at community level will be tremendous and very positive. Obesity is classified as an epidemic (WHO 2010) and diabetes type-2, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and osteoporosis are among the most costly diseases for all modern societies. Prevention of obesity and its secondary diseases would constitute a major medical breakthrough, reduce healthcare expenses significantly, and improve world health.

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