Modest selenium deficiency may increase risk of diseases of aging

Modest selenium deficiency may increase risk of diseases of aging

Researchers found that mutations in selenium-dependent proteins that are lost on modest selenium deficiency result in characteristics shared by age-related diseases including cancer, heart disease, and loss of immune or brain function.

Joyce C. McCann and Bruce N. Ames, highly respected researchers with the Nutrition and Metabolism Center at Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute in Oakland CA, have released a scientific review in the June online edition of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) Journal titled Adaptive dysfunction of selenoproteins from the perspective of the triage theory: why modest selenium deficiency may increase risk of diseases of aging. The review can be found at FASEB J. 2011 25:1793-1814. doi: 10.1096/fj.11-180885.

"This review should settle any debate about the importance of taking a good and complete multivitamin every day," said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., editor-in-chief of the FASEB Journal.

“As this report shows, taking a multivitamin that contains selenium is a good way to prevent deficiencies that, over time, can cause harm in ways that we are just beginning to understand," Weissmann said.

Researchers found that mutations in selenium-dependent proteins that are lost on modest selenium deficiency result in characteristics shared by age-related diseases including cancer, heart disease, and loss of immune or brain function.

“This research by McCann and Ames should change our current thinking as it examines moderate selenium and vitamin K deficiency to show how damage accumulates over time as a result of vitamin and mineral loss, leading to age-related diseases,” said Paul Willis, chief executive officer of Cypress Systems, the Fresno-based biotechnology company and leaders of high selenium yeast production.   

Dr. Mark Whitacre, chief operating officer and chief science officer of Cypress Systems, who holds a PhD in nutritional biochemistry at Cornell University where his thesis research focused on selenium research, says “Following a comprehensive study of this research, I believe this is the best research review that I have seen in my many years in this field.”

“It supports the need for selenium supplementation even at modest deficiencies,” added Whitacre.

SelenoExcell High Selenium Yeast, the flagship branded ingredient from Cypress Systems, was standardized and approved as the research standard selenium yeast source by the Division of Cancer Prevention of the National Cancer Institute, which resulted in the signing of a Clinical Trial Agreement in 1998. As a result of these efforts, SelenoExcell has been selected as the sole intervention agent in a series of cancer prevention and health related trials. The company maintains a clear focus on the mission to advance the prevention of chronic diseases, as opposed to treatment, through selenium supplementation and overall health stewardship.

 “We cannot forget the basics to good health as our tendency is to look for the next silver bullet, while we often overlook the foundational principals to a sound nutrition and a healthy lifestyle,” said Willis.

“It is our goal at Cypress and our Healthy Odds website (www.healthyodds.com ) to present everyday measures that health conscious people can take to live a healthier and more productive life. As supported by this research, selenium is a first line of defense.”  

For more information about Cypress Systems and clinical trials visit www.CypSystems.com.

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