New Book Reveals The Power of Tomato Lycopene

Remember the dietary rule advising us to eat five fruits and vegetable every day? Well, not all fruits provide equal benefits. A new book called "The Red Bodyguard" shows that there is much evidence to support the importance of the tomato in our diet. The tomato is superior to other fruits when it comes to disease prevention.

"The Red Bodyguard" discusses tomato lycopene for the prevention of illness. The book, published by Icon Books, is now available through bookstores in UK, Ireland, Canada, Australia and South Africa and will be available in USA from January 09. The author, Ron Levin, a former research pharmacist, worked for Beecham, Syntex and for 8 years as Managing Director of a very successful UK Johnson & Johnson pharma company. Together with science writer Gerard Cheshire, Ron explains how tomatoes in the diet can offer all of us, and especially those aged 40 and over, the prospect of better health. "Turning to the published studies” says Ron “ I was astonished to discover that several hundred scientists at nutritional and medical research centers in at least 24 countries had been investigating the amazing health promoting properties of the tomato for some 20 years! and decided it was time to let the public in on the good news”.

In his newly published paperback book "The Red Bodyguard" Ron explains clearly just how natural tomato lycopene can offer such amazing health benefits. "LycoRed Ltd. has developed Lyc-O-MatoÃ’, an outstanding tomato ingredient that could help in the prevention of several major diseases. Their scientific contribution to natural tomato lycopene research has been invaluable"

"The Red Bodyguard" is essential reading for health-conscious consumers who want to know how the powerful properties of the tomato can help defend their health. It is simply written yet provides strong scientific background. It starts with the tomato's history and ends with delicious tomato recipes.

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