New glucosamine research presented at Experimental Biology

New glucosamine research presented at Experimental Biology

More research is needed, but the preliminary findings provide important foundational data for Cargill in its effort to help understand glucosamine’s potential mechanism of action.

Preclinical research exploring the mechanistic action of glucosamine in cellular health will be presented at Experimental Biology in San Diego, Calif., April 21-24, by Drs. Martin Lotz and Beatriz Carames from The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif.

The authors conclude that, “These findings suggest that glucosamine is an effective autophagy activator and motivate future studies on its efficacy in modifying aging-related cellular changes and supporting joint health.” Autophagy is a critical mechanism in maintaining cellular health in joints and other tissues throughout the body. The study results show that glucosamine activates autophagy in cell culture and in animal models.

“Two of the gaps in the current body of research on glucosamine are data in a healthy population and understanding its mechanism of action,” said Jennifer van de Ligt, Ph.D., senior manager, Cargill Nutrition, Scientific and Regulatory Affairs. “This preliminary research indicates that glucosamine may help to support healthy aging in the joints via activation of autophagy, one of the main cellular ‘housekeeping’ mechanisms.”

More research is needed, but the preliminary findings provide important foundational data for Cargill in its effort to help understand glucosamine’s potential mechanism of action.

“The results of this research are very encouraging,” said Mark Christiansen, Acidulants product line manager, Cargill Corn Milling North America. “Understanding the science behind glucosamine’s potential role in joint health is important for consumers as well as our customers and Cargill will continue to invest in science and innovation for Regenasure glucosamine.”
 

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