Omega Protein Comments on California Lawsuit Alleging Fish Oil Contaminants

Omega Protein Comments on California Lawsuit Alleging Fish Oil Contaminants
HOUSTON, March 3, 2010 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ -- Omega Protein Corporation /quotes/comstock/13*!ome/quotes/nls/ome (OME 4.45, -0.12, -2.63%) , the nation's leading producer of Omega-3 fish oil and specialty fish meal products, is disappointed that plaintiffs in California have filed a lawsuit yesterday against eight dietary supplement brands and retailers. The Company's products are in full compliance with all federal laws promulgated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, standards of the European Commission and the labeling requirements of California's Proposition 65. In addition, the Company's products meet the rigorous standards for quality promulgated by both the Center for Responsible Nutrition (CRN) and the Global Organization for EPA and DHA Omega-3's (GOED).

The Company has worked cooperatively with the groups behind the lawsuit in California for the past several months, sharing information and answering any questions that arose. There are many issues on which Omega Protein disagrees with the plaintiffs, including methods of measuring PCBs, the level of PCBs at which a warning would be required, testing protocols, and applicable industry standards. Omega Protein takes very seriously its obligations to meet regulatory requirements and consumer expectations for safe and effective products.

About Omega Protein

Omega Protein Corporation is the nation's largest manufacturer of heart-healthy fish oils containing Omega-3 fatty acids for human consumption, as well as specialty fish meals and fish oil used as value-added ingredients in aquaculture, swine and other livestock feeds. Omega Protein makes its products from menhaden, an Omega-3 rich fish that is not utilized as seafood, but which is abundantly available along the U.S. Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Coasts.

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