Study says bean and artichoke extracts increase satiety

Study says bean and artichoke extracts increase satiety

A new study from the journal Phytotherapy Research found that bean and artichoke extracts  showed a significant increase in feelings of satiety and helped participants lose weight.

From the American Herbal Products Association (AHPA)

"A two-month, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial using special extracts of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and artichoke (Cynara scolymus) in 40 overweight and obese men and women showed a significant increase in feelings of satiety of the supplemented group compared to the controls. Although the supplemented group also lost more weight than the control group, the difference did not reach statistical significance over the course of the trial."

From Phytotherapy Research, September 2011:

Appetite Control and Glycaemia Reduction in Overweight Subjects treated with a Combination of Two Highly Standardized Extracts from Phaseolus vulgaris and Cynara scolymus


The management of overweight may include the use of dietary supplements targeted to favour the increase of the satiation associated with a decrease in blood glucose and lipid levels. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a dietary supplementation with an extract from Phaseolus vulgaris and Cynara scolymus, on satiation, the glucose and lipid pattern. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed in 39 overweight subjects (20 supplemented group, 19 placebo group) for 2 months. The modification of satiation, by Haber's scale, was the primary end-point, and the variation of the glucose and lipid pattern, of the anthropometric parameters and of the psychodynamic tests score were the secondary end-points. At the end of treatment, the net change of the Haber's mean score increased significantly in the intervention group. The net change of the glycaemia and of the dietary restriction score of the three factor eating questionnaire (TFEQ), were reduced significantly only in the intervention group. Moreover, in the supplemented group, the homeostasis model assessment, the body mass index and the susceptibility-to-hunger score of the TFEQ, decreased significantly after intervention; these parameters did not change in the controls. This treatment appears potentially useful in the management of overweight and dysglycaemia.

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