Sabinsa adds 4 new U.S. patents to its portfolio

Sabinsa Corporation adds four new U.S. patents to its portfolio, now totaling 95.

Sabinsa Corporation and its sister company Sami Labs Limited (Bangalore, India) added to their very long track record of innovative Intellectual Property development with four new U.S. patents, bringing the company’s patent portfolio total to 95. These most recent patents include:

US Patent 8383594 was accorded to the invention titled “Peptides modified with triterpenoids and small organic molecules: synthesis and use in cosmeceuticals”.  OLEPENT® has been shown by extensive research to be stable and capable of delivering the active principles right into the target areas of the skin with profound beneficial effects on aspect of skin aging.

US Patent 8394852 is for the invention titled “Inotilone derivatives as coherent biological response modifier (cBMR)”. The invention discloses a new composition of matter, an inotilone analog, and also its ability to modulate biological responses.

US Patent 8853407, a process patent for the synthesis of 4-aryl 4-acyl piperidine, its salts and analogs using indium metal. The invention is for a shorter, practical, scalable synthetic method for the synthesis of the 4-aryl 1, 4-diacyl dihydropyridine group of compounds. The extensive applications of 4-aryl 4-acyl piperidine in the fields of investigation drugs and medicinal chemistry are well known. The earlier known synthetic methods involved lengthy processes, use of hazardous chemicals and non-scalability at industrial levels. The SAMI-SABINSA process overcomes all the technical challenges by using favorable starting materials and metallic indium as a catalyst in a safe synthetic process. 

US Patent 8987212, Sabinsa’s triterpenoid peptide product OLEPENT® received its second U.S. patent, which claims therapeutic efficacy in effectively reducing skin wrinkling through anti-elastase activity. The signal peptide technology disclosed in this patent demonstrates an effective therapeutic means to counter the ill effects of serine protease enzymes on the human skin. 

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