Sports drink volumes in good shape

Global consumption of sports drinks grew 5.9% to 11.6 billion litres in 2007, according to a new report from food and drink consultancy Zenith International.

North America retained pole position as the largest sports drinks market, with a 48% volume share, according to the report, titled Global Sports Drinks. However, emerging regions, particularly Eastern Europe and the Middle East, experienced the most impressive growth rates.

By 2012, Zenith anticipates that the global sports drinks market will have reached 15.5 billion litres, a rise of 33% from 2007, taking average annual consumption to 2.3 litres per person.

Other key findings from the 2008 Global Sports Drinks report include:

  • The global sports drinks market grew 1.1% in value during 2007 to ?18.5 billion.
  • Global consumption per person was 1.8 litres in 2007.
  • Gatorade from PepsiCo and Powerade from The Coca-Cola Company continue to be the leading global brands.
  • Asia-Pacific is the second largest region by volume, with Japan and China accounting for 70% of this.

Zenith said recent new product launches indicated a continuing trend towards sport-energy hybrids, dairy-based recovery drinks and sports drinks that used natural ingredients — such as coconut water, a natural isotonic.

"In well developed markets, momentum has been driven by consumer interest in health and wellness," said Zenith market intelligence director Gary Roethenbaugh. "New formulation and ingredient developments have also helped to broaden consumption occasions and target new consumer segments. There is now a plethora of products available for all age and activity levels. More recent innovations include low-calorie variants for calorie-conscious consumers, drinks specifically formulated for active children and dairy-based recovery drinks."

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