Suntava purple corn now Non-GMO Project Verified

Suntava purple corn now Non-GMO Project Verified

All-natural, gluten-free, antioxidant-rich ingredient now carries the Non-GMO Project seal, giving food manufacturers more reason to go purple.

Suntava Inc., developer of the game-changing purple corn, has announced that its versatile, highly nutritious product is now Non-GMO Project Verified. Products bearing this seal are shown to have met the standards for avoidance of foods produced from genetically modified organisms (GMOs). 

“Receiving the Non-GMO Project seal is an additional verification of the importance and value of our purple corn,” Suntava CEO Bill Petrich said. “We’re proud to be recognized and pleased to be at the forefront of advancing the cause of providing the consumer with foods that are naturally fortified, and safe.”

The Non-GMO Project is a nonprofit organization committed to preserving and building the non-GMO food supply. Chief among its goals is educating consumers—providing verified choices about whether or not to consume GMO’s. The Project, which has gained significant consumer recognition since it began in 2010, is governed by a board of directors that works with a collaborative network of professional advisors from varying backgrounds and sectors.

A world free of GMOs would create a distribution system that could be a boon for food and beverage manufacturers, leading to good-tasting, safe and nutritious products for the consumer. 

As food manufacturers, brand marketers and consumers extend their search for naturally fortified ingredients with value-added benefits, they look to products like Suntava’s purple corn. Being an all-natural, gluten-free ingredient with an antioxidant level twice that of blueberries and now Non-GMO Project Verified, the Power of Purple rings clear.

As nationally syndicated physician Dr. Mehmet Oz put it, “Purple foods and vegetables are the foundation of my diet.”

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