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5@5: Companies clean up feminine care | Meet Chobani's first food incubator class

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top food and supplement headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

A new wave of socially conscious tampon companies focuses on organics and giving back

Cora, Lola and Conscious Period are part of a new class of feminine care companies that say the feminine care industry is under-researched, under-regulated and in need of more transparency. They're focused on products made with organic cotton and other natural ingredients, to minimize the number of chemicals entering a woman's body each month. These companies also employ buy-one-give-one models that deliver sanitary products to low-income women in various parts of the world. Read more at Fast Company...

 

Chobani showcases inaugural class of the Chobani Food Incubator

Expo West was also "demo day" for the six startups that participated in Chobani's first six-month incubator program: Banza, CHOPS Snacks, Cisse Cocoa Co., JAR Goods, Kettle & Fire and MISFIT Juicery. Read more at Deli Market News...

 

Americans ate 19 percent less beef from '05 to '14, report says

New research from the NRDC revealed that Americans cut their beef intake by nearly one-fifth over 10 years. Chicken and pork fell as well, but less drastically. The agency also says that changes in the American diet over that time reduced greenhouse gas emissions significantly. Read more at The New York Times...

 

Why more farmers are making the switch to grass-fed meat and dairy

Sales of grass-fed beef is up more than 25 percent annually, while grass-fed yogurt and kefir product sales jumped 38 percent, according to SPINS. Meanwhile, increasing grain feed prices has put the squeeze on conventional dairy farmers and tightened their profit margins. Companies like Maple Hill and EPIC are helping farmers convert. Read more at NPR... 

 

Supermarkets are losing the grocery price war

Faced with low food prices and fierce competition, supermarkets are running aggressive promotions, trying fight for new shoppers and maintain their revenue. Read more at USA Today...

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