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[email protected]: EPA environmental leader resigns | Groups sue to reduce factory farm pollution

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top food and supplement headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

EPA environmental justice leader resigns, amid White House plans to dismantle program

Last week, the White House's budget proposal indicated that the Office of Environmental Justice would be closed. Mustafa Ali, a senior advisor and founder of that office, announced today that he is resigning the position he's held for more than 20 years. Ali said he could not approve changes that would cause disadvantaged communities to be subjected to more air and water pollution. Read more in The Washington Post ...

 

Groups seek end to factory farm pollution loopholes dating back to 1970s

Food & Water Watch is leading a group of 35 organizations in asking the EPA to require factory farms to limit the amount of animal waste that ends up in fields and waterways. Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations — the official name for factory farms — can house tens of thousands of animals and have become one of the most significant sources of water pollution in the nation. Read more in InsideClimate News ...

 

Eating healthier food could reduce greenhouse gas emissions, says a new study out of UCSB

Healthier diets could help combat climate change, according to researchers at UC Santa Barbara. Diets that include less red meat result in fewer green house gases being pumped into our atmosphere. Of course, people who eat healthier diets have lower risks of coronary heart disease, colorectal cancer and Type 2 diabetes, as well. Read more in The UC Santa Barbara Current ...

 

Social media a top investment for grocers: Report

Three-quarters of U.S. grocery retailers, particularly chains of 50 or more stores, are significantly investing in social media to reach customers, according to a new survey. Still, there’s room to grow. Read more in Progressive Grocer …

 

From new beans to ancient plants, drought-busting crops take root

Scientists are in a race against time and climate change to find or create food crops that are more drought-tolerant. Meanwhile, the farmers have some plants in their pockets now. Read more at Thomson Reuters Foundation …

 

 

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