5@5: Food prices rise for sixth-straight month | Farmers choose between low yields, unpredictable revenue

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Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top food and supplement headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

Food prices rose in June for sixth-straight month

The cost of food rose by 0.6% in June according to data released this week by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. These higher prices come at a time when employees are facing a second round of shutdowns and the government's pandemic unemployment assistance is expiring at the end of July. Read more at NBC

 

Climate change will force farmers to choose between low yields, unpredictable revenue

A new study has found that farmers who stick with conventional crops will have lower yields as climate change steamrolls ahead, while those who adapt drought-resistant crop varieties face revenue unpredictability. Researchers recommend farmers use more agrobiodiversity and tap into seed banks, but also note that for agriculture to contend with climate change it's going to require the entire supply chain and all levels of government to participate. Read more at Modern Farmer

 

Oat milk pioneer Oatly raises $200M

Despite the pandemic, venture investment in plant-based milks is by all appearances going strong. One such company, Oatly, announced that it has received $200 million in funding on a $2 billion valuation led by the Blackstone Group. 2019 saw a rapid growth in demand for oat milk products, which led to Oatly shortages and a cult-like following for the brand. Read more at The Spoon

 

How coronavirus spread through JBS’s Greeley beef plant

A shocking two-thirds of Colorado's COVID-19 cases consist of JBS Greeley meat plant employees. The company has been accused of failing to implement adequate social distancing measures and doing so at a point when the virus had already begun to spread in earnest, leading to the deaths of six workers. Read more at The Denver Post

 

Fishcakes in space? How one company is fermenting far-out food

Humans are likely to spend more time in space as technology continues advancing, but finding ways to make food in space is imperative if this vision is to become a reality. California-based startup Finless Foods believes that cell-cultured meat can fill some of the nutritional needs of future space travelers, in addition to being a sustainable option for consumers on Earth. Read more at Forbes

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