5@5: ‘Milk With Dignity’ benefits dairy workers | USDA to clarify what food labels mean

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top food and supplement headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

Ben & Jerry's 'Milk With Dignity' pact with farmworkers seems to be paying off

Milk prices have declined for four consecutive years, and dairy workers have suffered as a result. But some Vermont workers are doing a little better because their employers agreed to follow labor and housing standards in exchange for contracting with Ben & Jerry’s, which is owned by Unilever. Read more at NPR

 

FDA Commissioner Gottlieb tweets about plans to review some of those labeling claims

Via Twitter, Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb announce he plans to release detailed descriptions about various terms found on food labels. The information is in response to Henry Miller’s Wall Street Journal column, “The Organic Industry is Lying to You.” (New Hope’s Jenna Blumenfeld also penned a reply to Miller’s opinion piece.) Read more at Food Safety News

 

When the menu says ‘organic,’ but all the food isn’t

Restaurants that claim their meals are organic may not be. The USDA doesn’t inspect the offerings or the ingredients unless the restaurant actually seeks organic certification. Otherwise, it’s OK for a restaurant to describe their food as organic as long as the management made “a reasonable effort” to include organic ingredients. For 51-year-old Gil Rosenberg of Queens, New York, however, that wasn’t enough. Read more at The New York Times ….

 

You could buy WSDA-certified organic pot next year

Colorado was the first state to legalize recreational marijuana, but Washington apparently will be first to certify the herb “to organic-like standards” beginning in 2019. The state agency can’t say the product is organic because the federal government controls the use of that word and the federal government still considers marijuana illegal. Tentative rules for the program have yet to be released. Read more at The Stranger

 

How engineering the climate could mess with our food

Could humans control or even manage the sun’s radiation? After Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines erupted in 1991 and reduced by 21 percent direct sunlight reaching the Earth, scientists started thinking about the idea. If they could control the process, we could fight global warming by bouncing light off particulates in the atmosphere and cool down our planet. The journal Nature recently looked back at the theory and realized it’s not what those scientist had hoped. Read more at Wired

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