cattle-cows-calves-promo-Getty.jpg Getty Images

[email protected]: Missouri set to define meat | Republican mayor wants a green town

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top food and supplement headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

Missouri may be first state to get serious about the definition of meat

The Missouri Legislature has passed an agricultural bill that defines meat as “derived from harvested production livestock or poultry.” The Missouri Cattlemen’s Association backed the proposal; its spokesman said, “There’s a lot of unknown about (meat substitutes) and safety protocols and nutrition and all of that.” The Good Food Institute opposed the bill, noting that it could create significant hurdles for producers. Read more at KCUR.org …

A growing epidemic of toxic algal blooms

The number of toxic algal blooms in U.S. waters has increased 5,633 percent—to 169 in 2017, from 3 in 2010—according to new research from the Environmental Working Group. The author of EWG’s report says toxic algal blooms can cause problems for people such as headaches, liver damage or cancer. In the case of Lake Erie, where blooms threatened Toledo, Ohio’s drinking water in 2014, fertilizer from agricultural run-off are to blame. Read more at Great Lakes Now …

This 70-year-old Republican mayor wants to prove that his small southern town can go green

Abita Springs, Louisiana, Mayor Greg Lemons wants to make his town an environmentalist’s dream: It plans to operate every city property, every business and every home using renewable energy within the next 12 years. Shortly after he became mayor, he fought a gas company’s plan to drill a well near the local high school. Read more at Mother Jones …

Drink to your health: Kombucha’s unlikely rise from Soviet elixir to modern-day miracle drink

Kombucha is everywhere: local stores, coffee shops, chain stores and TV shows. The fermented beverage has been attached to a variety of health claims, but many consumers now seek it out because they believe it supports a healthy gut microbiome, which leads to better overall health. The history of the beverage, however, is probably as interesting as its myths. Read more in Eater …

Whole Foods quietly pauses its GMO labeling requirements

Is Whole Foods backing off its commitment to transparent GMO labeling? President and COO A.C. Gallo sent an email on May 18 informing suppliers that the company’s food-labeling requirements deadline is being extended. The announcement apparently was a response to suppliers’ concerns that they would have to meet Whole Foods’ requirements as well as the USDA’s, which are in the midst of the approval process. Read more at The New Food Economy …

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish