Hurricane Florence as seen from the ISS Sept. 10, 2018 Ricky Arnold/NASA

5@5: North Carolina faces Florence unprepared | Farm Bill gap too wide for Congress

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top food and supplement headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

That time North Carolina passed a law against climate change

Hurricane Florence likely will strike North Carolina with impossibly high sea surges and unimaginable rainstorms. Unlike Virginia and New Jersey, however, North Carolina has not prepared for this scenario, as property values took priority over preparation. Read more at The Guardian

 

The House is trying to sneak these controversial changes into the Farm Bill

The differences between the Senate and House versions of the 2018 Farm Bill may be insurmountable: The House wants SNAP (formerly food stamps) recipients to work for their food; the Senate’s Democrats refuse. The House also wants to prevent local governments from restricting pesticide use; let wealthy farmers continue to receive crop subsidies; and wipe out a major conservation program. Read more at Mother Jones

 

Defying Trump, China and California will work together to fight climate change

California and China are strengthening their cross-Pacific ties to cut greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate climate change, officials announced Wednesday at the Global Climate Action Summit. Chinese officials packed the room where Gov. Jerry Brown announced the pact. Both sides will work together on fuel cells, zero-emission vehicles and more. Read more at Grist

 

Germany’s ProVeg International launches incubator for vegan startups

Formerly the Vegetarian Federation of Germany, ProVeg is starting an incubator for start-ups creating innovative vegetable products through such means as cellular agriculture or repurposing vegetables as eggs, seafood and meat. Read more at LiveKindly.co

 

Precious as silver, vanilla brings cash and crime to Madagascar

Madagascar’s northeastern mountains are home to about 80 percent of the planet’s vanilla, which is now valued at more than $600 a kilogram ($270 a pound), an increase of 1,100 percent since 2013. The higher prices have brought both benefits and trouble to the poor island nation. Read more at The New York Times

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