[email protected]: Twinlab names new CEO | France a burgeoning market for vegan products

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top food and supplement headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

Twinlab Consolidated Holdings names Anthony Zolezzi CEO

Entrepreneur and natural products adviser Anthony Zolezzi will take the top spot at supplements company Twinlab following the departure of Naomi Whittel earlier this year. He co-founded Code Blue Recycling and Pet Promise, both of which were acquired by large companies. Read more at Globe Newswire…

 

Vegans are rising in France

French consumers are finally waking up to the vegan movement, animal welfare leaders say. The animal products industry in France generates some 26 billion euros ($30 billion) annually and employs thousands of people, so critics of the treatment of animals have lacked wide support even as the movement has grown immensely in other countries. But organizations such as L214 and Greenpeace are making headway. “A new generation of activists is making people realize that even in the land of meat, there is very little that makes the case for having it,” says author Geoffrey Le Guilcher. Read more at Bloomberg…

 

As wealthy millennials take control of family fortunes, impact investing is set for a big boost

As younger generations take over the family office, they’re putting more money into social and environmental causes like education, environmental conservation, and agriculture and food. In a recent survey, two-fifths of family offices said they expect to put more toward these causes in the next decade. But difficulties with measuring social impact is a major hurdle for impact investing. Read more at Fast Company…

 

Kroger hosts third Natural Foods Innovation Summit

The retailer, which sold $2 billion worth of Simple Truth products last year, brought together more than 50 brands to participate in its third Natural Foods Innovation Summit. Read more at Produce News…

 

Meal-kit solutions lack one key ingredient: Human-centered design

It’s not just the meal kit business model that makes them a tough proposition, according to retail expert Chris Walton, who says they also ignore the principles of human-centered design. “The fundamental problem with meal kits is that they ask consumers to rejigger a centuries-old process and consumer behavior with which they are already quite comfortable—shopping for groceries,” he writes. Read more at Forbes… 

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