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Articles from 2000 In October


Delicious Living

November 1, 2000

Smart Sugar Substitutes

Unrefined sweeteners, unlike white sugar, are easier on blood-sugar levels, provide more nutrients and satisfy your sweet tooth craving — naturally. Try these smart solutions:

Brown Rice Syrup - Healthful and satisfying syrup derived from brown rice gets high marks for its delicate taste and overall versatility. It digests much more slowly than white sugar and is about half as sweet. High in potassium, with small amounts of protein, calcium and B vitamins.

Brown Rice Syrup & Grape Juice Concentrate - (for example, FruitSource) A smart-cooking staple that combines complex carbohydrates (brown rice) and simple carbohydrates (fruit juice). Metabolizes slowly, providing more enduring energy and no sugar crash.

Maple Sugar - Sweeter than white sugar, pure maple sugar adds complex carbohydrates, trace minerals and delicious flavor to baked goods. Accept no imitations; if it's not labeled "pure," it's probably mixed with cane or corn sugar. It can be costly, so look for organic varieties sold in bulk.

Fruit Juice - "I've always been surprised how versatile fruit juice is," says chef Mäni Naill. In many recipes, Naill recommends using fruit juice reduction that's easily made at home. Boil 12 ounces juice concentrate — apple or white grape work best — about 10 minutes until it reaches the consistency of thick syrup and measures 1 cup. Cool completely before using.

Malt-Sweetened Chocolate Chips - Made without refined sugar or dairy products. Less sweet than regular chocolate, but just as addictive. If melting, heat gently in a double boilder over hot, not boiling, water. Melting these chips in a microwave is not recommended, as the chips can scorch easily.

Vanilla or Carob Soy Milk - Substitute for plain milk or cream in baked goods for a rich, smooth taste. Heat only until very hot; do not simmer, as it will curdle.



Cyvex Appointed Distributor for SPI Diana

Berric, France - October 25, 2000 - SPI Diana, a worldwide developer of food ingredients made from natural products, has granted Cyvex Nutrition an exclusive North American distributorship for chicken collagen type II with chondroitin sulfate. The product was developed at SPI Diana's biotechnology center in Berric, France, using a unique process (French patent # FR 2 782 607, World and U.S. patent pending). Chicken collagen type II with chondroitin sulfate is believed to significantly improve the symptoms of pain and degree of inflammation in patients suffering from osteoarthritis.

"We predict this unique nutraceutical will continue to be in great demand because of the aging population's need for arthritic relief," explains Managing Director Eric Dropsy. "We believe in the product, and we also believe in Cyvex, its supplier. Since we are one of the largest French processors of poultry ingredients, we are highly concerned with the quality of products we obtain from our suppliers. Fortunately, we have total confidence in Cyvex's quality control methods."

Similar to SPI Diana, Cyvex is certified as an ISO 9002 facility. Considered the "gold standard" for superior products and services, ISO's quality assurance system has formalized procedures to ensure proper documentation, inventory, handling, and quality control of all materials that enter or exit a registered facility. In addition, the ISO standard requires management review of the system, continually improving work processes.

Continuous improvement is vital, believes Gilbert Gluck, president of Cyvex Nutrition, because "The nutraceutical industry lacks government-imposed regulatory audits and standards. Therefore, the ISO standards and system of auditing benefit companies seeking to improve the quality of their products." Gluck adds, "We're honored that SPI Diana has chosen us as their North American distributor, and we look forward to a mutually beneficial business relationship."

SPI stands for "Societe de Proteines Industielles." SPI Diana is a subsidiary of Diana Ingredients, founded in 1980 and in recent years has expanded its offerings from meat-based ingredients to vegetable ingredients and amino-acids. With its global customer base, Diana now has 11 sites in Europe, as well as in North and South America.

Founded in 1984, Cyvex Nutrition is recognized industry-wide as a trusted supplier of specialty ingredients including plant extracts and botanicals, marine nutraceuticals, fine chemicals, grape products and nootropics for memory and concentration.

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Delicious Living

ARCHIVE: Mushroom Sauce

Mushroom Sauce
October, 2000

Mushroom SauceServes 8 or Makes 4 Cups / The mixture of mushrooms in this sauce provides interest and a more developed flavor than found in single-mushroom dishes. Prep Time: 15 Minutes Cooking Time: 15 Minutes

1 cup dried mushrooms (about 1 ounce)
1 cup boiling water
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 medium leeks, thinly sliced
6 cloves garlic, chopped
1 bay leaf
6 cups mixed fresh mushrooms (shiitake, chanterelle, oyster, crimini)
1/2 cup tomato juice
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons shoyu (wheat-free tamari)
1/2 cup fresh chopped herbs of your choice
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
1/4 cup low-fat sour cream (optional)
Grated Parmesan cheese

1. Rinse dried mushrooms thoroughly. Place in a heat-proof bowl and cover with boiling water. Soak until soft. Remove rehydrated mushrooms from water, mince and set aside. Let liquid settle for 5 minutes. Pour off and reserve clear portion. Save this liquid for sauce.
2. Heat oil in a heavy pot. Sauté leek, garlic and bay leaf for 5 minutes. Meanwhile, remove stems from fresh mushrooms, and cut mushrooms into small cubes. Add to leek and garlic mixture. Cook, stirring frequently, until mushrooms begin giving off their juices. Add reserved, rehydrated mushrooms, 1/2 cup clear soaking water, tomato juice, lemon juice and shoyu. Stir well, bring to a simmer and cook for 15-20 minutes. This allows sauce to reduce and flavors to blend.
3. Remove from heat and stir in herbs. Season with salt and pepper. Add sour cream (if desired) for a lighter-colored sauce. Serve garnished with Parmesan cheese.

Calories 104,Fat 5,Perfat 41,Cholesterol 3,Carbo 12,Protein 4,Fiber N/A,Sodium N/A
Delicious Living

ARCHIVE: Fresh Baby Spinach With Wild Mushrooms

Fresh Baby Spinach With Wild Mushrooms
October, 2000

Mushroom SaladServes 4 / Accompanied by a warm loaf of French bread, this lovely and simple salad makes an elegant first course or a light lunch. Prep Time: 10 Minutes Cooking Time: 15 Minutes

1 pound mixed wild mushrooms (shiitake, portobello, oyster, chanterelle)
2 tablespoons olive oil
6 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
1/2 cup mushroom soaking liquid
2 teaspoons fresh herbs (tarragon, thyme, basil or marjoram)
3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
Salt and pepper to taste
6 cups baby spinach, rinsed
Grated cheese (Parmesan, Romano or Asiago)
Enoki mushrooms (optional)

1. Rinse mushrooms. Remove stems and save for stock. Chop or slice mushrooms, depending upon size. Remove gills from portobellos.
2. Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a skillet and sauté garlic carefully for 5 minutes. Add mushrooms (except enoki) and cook, stirring until they begin to release their juices. Add soaking liquid and simmer for 5 to 10 minutes to slightly reduce liquids. Add herbs, balsamic vinegar and salt and pepper. Stir well.
3. Place spinach in a large salad bowl. Top with mushrooms and their sauce. Toss well to slightly wilt spinach. Taste and adjust seasonings if needed.
4. Serve garnished with grated cheese and enoki mushrooms.

Calories 100,Fat 6,Perfat 54,Cholesterol 4,Carbo 7,Protein 6,Fiber N/A,Sodium N/A
Delicious Living

ARCHIVE: Grilled Vegetable Paella

Grilled Vegetable Paella
October, 2000

Grilled Vegetable PaellaServes 8 / Paellas were first cooked many centuries ago in the farmlands of Spain, over an open fire. They are still prepared this way, but also cook well on a charcoal or gas grill. Prep Time: 30 Minutes Cooking Time: 30-40 Minutes

6 cups vegetable broth
1/2 teaspoon saffron threads
3-4 Roma tomatoes
1 10-ounce package frozen
artichoke hearts
1/2 cup green beans
2 summer squash, sliced lengthwise
1 green or yellow pepper, halved
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 small red onion, quartered and sliced
3-4 cloves garlic, minced
1 1/2 cups arborio rice or other medium-grain rice
1/4 teaspoon salt (optional)
1/8 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon paprika

1. Prepare a fire in a kettle grill or preheat a gas grill to high.
2. Combine broth and saffron in a saucepan. Bring to a boil. Cover; set aside.
3. Dice tomatoes. Slice artichoke hearts in half and cut green beans into 1-inch slices. Set vegetables aside in individual bowls.
4. Place summer squashes and pepper on grill. Cook for 4-5 minutes on each side. Leave pepper on grill until its skin is evenly charred. Remove and set aside until cool. Remove the charred pepper skin and cut pepper into 1-inch pieces.
5. Add olive oil to a paellera or large cast- iron skillet. Add onion and garlic; sauté 3-5 minutes or until slightly caramelized. Add rice to pan and sauté 1-2 minutes more.
6. Stir in a third of boiling broth mixture. Add cut-up peppers and squashes, tomatoes, salt, pepper and paprika. As broth is absorbed, add more until rice is tender. Add green beans and artichokes the last 5 minutes of cooking. Cover paella with a clean dish towel and let sit for 5 minutes.

Calories 232,Fat 6,Perfat 22,Cholesterol 0,Carbo 41,Protein 5,Fiber N/A,Sodium N/A
Delicious Living

ARCHIVE: Almond Rice Pudding With Dried Cherries

Rice PuddingServes 8 / Traditional rice pudding has a long history in both Great Britain and the United States. This uniquely flavored dessert is also very low in fat. Prep Time: 15 Minutes Cooking Time: 50 Minutes

1 1/3 cups nonfat milk
1 teaspoon almond extract
1 egg
1 egg white
1/2 cup brown sugar or 1/4 cup honey
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon butter, melted
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/2 cup dried cherries
2 cups short-grain cooked rice

1. Preheat oven to 325º Lightly grease a baking dish with lid (or use individual ramekins).
2. Combine milk, almond extract, eggs, sugar, salt, butter and lemon juice. Beat well. Add cherries and rice; stir to combine. Pour mixture into baking dish.
3. Cover and bake until set, about 45-50 minutes.

Calories 152,Fat 3,Perfat 15,Cholesterol 31,Carbo 29,Protein 4,Fiber N/A,Sodium N/A

Delicious Living

ARCHIVE: Risotto Con Fagioli

Risotto Con Fagioli
October, 2000

Risotto con FagioliServes 4 / This classic Italian pasta and bean dish is irresistibly good and cheap! Kids especially love it. You can speed up cooking time by preparing beans in a pressure cooker. Prep Time: 20 minutes Cooking Time: 2 hours

1 cup dried kidney beans
6 cups water
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 onion, finely chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 carrot, thinly sliced
1 green pepper, chopped
2 cups canned stewed tomatoes
1 teaspoon salt
8 ounces pasta elbows, shells or macaroni
3 tablespoons fresh basil, chopped, or 1 tablespoon dried basil

1. Soak beans overnight. Drain off soaking water, rinse beans and drain again. Put soaked beans into a large, heavy-bottomed soup pot with 6 cups water. Bring to a boil, lower heat and simmer 112 to 2 hours until beans are tender. Drain excess liquid,leaving just enough to make a gravylike sauce.
2. Sauté onions, garlic, carrots and green pepper. Add vegetables, tomatoes and salt to beans and simmer 20 minutes.
3. In a separate pot, bring 2 quarts of salted water to a boil and cook pasta until al dente. Drain and rinse well. Gently stir pasta and basil into the beans and serve.

Calories 279,Fat 6,Perfat 19,Cholesterol 8,Carbo 46,Protein 9,Fiber N/A,Sodium N/A
Delicious Living

A look at the accuracy of homeopathy studies

While more and more studies are being conducted on the enigmatic topic of homeopathy, it's important to consider each particular study before drawing any conclusive results — for not all studies are created equal.

Researchers from the Department of Epidemiology and Health Care Research at the University of Limburg in The Netherlands assessed the methodological quality of 107 controlled trials in 96 published reports between the 1970s and early '90s on the efficacy of homeopathy in humans. Two studies included in this comprehensive overview were rated very highly: Ferley, et al. (1987) and Reilly, et al. (1986). In the Ferley study, 247 patients received the polypharmaceutical homeopathic medicine Anas barbariae hepatis, cordis extractum C200, manufactured by Boiron in Newton Square, Penn., and sold as Oscilloccinum, for the treatment of influenza; 241 patients received a placebo. The recovery rate for homeopathic patients was 17 percent in 48 hours; the placebo group's recovery rate was 10 percent in 48 hours.

Similarly, the study by Reilly, et al., gave Pollen C30, prepared by a homeopathic pharmacist, to 74 patients who were suffering from pollen allergy; 70 patients were given a placebo. A change in 100 mm visual analog scale for the symptoms was ­17 mm for the group treated with homeopathic medicine and ­2.6 mm for the placebo group.

The small number of controlled trials undertaken to date makes it difficult to understand homeopathic medicine. This is especially true because homeopathy's mechanism of action is unknown or cannot be accounted for within our current level of understanding of pharmacology and physics.


 

Delicious Living

Rice, The Seeds Of Life

Rice, the Seeds of Life
Intro by Elisa Bosley
Recipes by Patti Bess

Open your senses to the worldwide appeal of this simple grain.

At the height of India's rice harvest, dusty open-air markets swarm with people bent over bulging burlap sacks, purchasing rice by the bushel: fragrant, nutty basmati; delicate gobindavog; exotic Bhutanese red. Near the warm Mediterranean, paella pans — round, shallow, heavy, ranging from large to enormous — hang from hooks in market stalls in the shadow of ancient cathedrals, waiting to transform superfino Spanish rice into a regal meal. And in Latin America, rice is the cornerstone of every meal: topped with fried plantains at breakfast, thickening grandmother's black bean and avocado soup for the main midday meal, simmered with freshly grated coconut and sweet cream for that favorite evening dessert, arroz con leche.

Rice is the great equalizer. Featured in more cuisines and cultures than any other food throughout history, it can legitimately be called the seeds of life. Its affordability and ease of preparation make it a worldwide favorite; the Japanese call plain cooked rice gohan, or "honorable food." Every kind of rice — short-grained and sticky, long-grained and fluffy, medium-grained and creamy — is a nutritional boon, easy to digest, cholesterol-free and filled with complex carbohydrates and fiber to fuel the body and feed the soul. Unrivaled in its versatility, it is a most accommodating staple: able to be rolled, pounded, scooped, fluffed, paired only with salt or smothered with gourmet accoutrements. It is at once comfortable and exciting, familiar yet surprising — as witnessed by the many varieties, such as Chinese black rice, Louisiana pecan rice and Wehani red rice, now appearing in Western markets.

Let yourself be seduced by rice with these savory recipes from around the globe. Whether eaten in Kathmandu or at your kitchen table, you'll be enchanted by the possibilities.

Risotto con FagioliRisotto con Fagioli
Serves 6


This classic Italian risotto with beans — fagioli — comes from Tuscany. A medium-grain rice can be substituted for arborio.

Prep Time: 20 Minutes
Cooking Time: 25 Minutes

5 cups chicken or vegetable broth
1 tablespoon butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 cup finely minced onion
2 plum tomatoes, chopped
1 1/2 cups arborio rice
1 cup cooked Great Northern beans, rinsed and drained if canned
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
3 tablespoons chopped fresh basil or parsley
Salt and fresh ground pepper to taste

1. Bring broth to a steady simmer in a saucepan on stove top. Heat butter and oil in heavy 4-quart saucepan over moderate heat. Add onion and sauté for 1­2 minutes until it begins to soften, being careful not to brown it. Add tomatoes and cook for 3­4 minutes.

2. Reduce heat to a simmer and add rice. Stir for 1 minute to make sure all grains are well coated. Add 1/2 cup simmering broth and stir until it is completely absorbed. Continue to add broth, 1/2 cup at a time, stirring frequently until each addition is almost completely absorbed. Reserve about 1/4 cup.

3. After stirring approximately 18 minutes, when rice is tender but still firm, add reserved broth. Turn off heat and add beans, cheese and basil or parsley. Stir vigorously to combine with rice. Add salt and pepper, and serve immediately.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories: 279 Fat: 6 g % fat calories: 19 Cholesterol: 8 mg Carbohydrate: 46 g Protein: 9 g

Mexican Green Rice (Arroz Verde)
Serves 6


In most Mexican households, this herb-laced rice is served on special occasions.

Prep Time: 5­10 Minutes
Cooking Time: 45 Minutes

1/2 jalapeño pepper, seeds removed
2 fresh poblano chile peppers, inner membrane and seeds discarded
3­4 cloves garlic
1/2 green (sweet) pepper, inner membrane and seeds removed
2/3 cup packed fresh cilantro, divided
2 tablespoons high-quality vegetable oil
1/2 medium yellow onion
1 cup long-grain brown rice
2 1/4 cups vegetable broth
1/4 teaspoon salt

1. Combine chile peppers, garlic, sweet pepper, 1/2 cup cilantro and onion in blender; pulse until finely chopped but not puréed. Set aside.

2. Add oil to medium saucepan on medium-high heat. Add chile mixture and sauté for 3 minutes. Add rice and sauté until grains are thoroughly coated, about 2 minutes. Add broth and bring to a boil. Stir, reduce heat to low and cover tightly. Simmer 40­45 minutes.

3. Remove pan from heat and let stand for 5 minutes. Fluff with fork and add salt. Garnish with additional cilantro.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories: 184 Fat: 6 g % fat calories: 27 Cholesterol: 0 mg Carbohydrate: 30 g Protein: 3 g

Grilled Vegetable PaellaGrilled Vegetable Paella
Serves 8


Paellas were first cooked many centuries ago in the farmlands of Spain, over an open fire. They are still prepared this way, but also cook well on a charcoal or gas grill.

Prep Time: 30 Minutes
Cooking Time: 30­40 Minutes

6 cups vegetable broth
1/2 teaspoon saffron threads
3-4 Roma tomatoes
1 10-ounce package frozen
artichoke hearts
1/2 cup green beans
2 summer squash, sliced lengthwise
1 green or yellow pepper, halved
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 small red onion, quartered and sliced
3-4 cloves garlic, minced
1 1/2 cups arborio rice or other medium-grain rice
1/4 teaspoon salt (optional)
1/8 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon paprika

1. Prepare a fire in a kettle grill or preheat a gas grill to high.

2. Combine broth and saffron in a saucepan. Bring to a boil. Cover; set aside.

3. Dice tomatoes. Slice artichoke hearts in half and cut green beans into 1-inch slices. Set vegetables aside in individual bowls.

4. Place summer squashes and pepper on grill. Cook for 4­5 minutes on each side. Leave pepper on grill until its skin is evenly charred. Remove and set aside until cool. Remove the charred pepper skin and cut pepper into 1-inch pieces.

5. Add olive oil to a paellera or large cast- iron skillet. Add onion and garlic; sauté 3­5 minutes or until slightly caramelized. Add rice to pan and sauté 1­2 minutes more.

6. Stir in a third of boiling broth mixture. Add cut-up peppers and squashes, tomatoes, salt, pepper and paprika. As broth is absorbed, add more until rice is tender. Add green beans and artichokes the last 5 minutes of cooking. Cover paella with a clean dish towel and let sit for 5 minutes.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories: 232 Fat: 6 g % fat calories: 22 Cholesterol: 0 mg Carbohydrate: 41 g Protein: 5 g

Vegetable Biryani
Serves 12


The crowning glory of India's rice dishes is the Biryani. Some of the rice in this colorful dish will turn yellow, while some will be white.

Prep Time: 25 Minutes
Cooking Time: 40 Minutes

2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon poppy seeds
1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds (preferably black)
1/8 ­ 1/4 teaspoon cayenne to taste
3/4 teaspoon garam masala (a spice blend)
3/4 teaspoon coriander
2 teaspoons turmeric
1/2 cauliflower, cut into flowerets
2 small zucchini, cut into 1-inch slices
2 potatoes, cut into large cubes
1/2 large eggplant, cut into1-inch cubes
1 red pepper, diced
1 cup sliced onion
1/2 cup water
1 1/2 cups tomato purée
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups cooked basmati rice, divided
1/2 cup chopped, toasted almonds
1/2 cup raisins

1. Heat oil in a large Dutch oven. Add poppy and mustard seeds and cook over medium-low heat until seeds start to pop. Reduce heat to low and stir in remaining spices. Cook for 1 minute.

2. Increase heat to medium-high and add vegetables. Stir-fry for 2 minutes. Add water, tomato purée and salt. Cover and cook over low heat until vegetables are almost tender, about 10­15 minutes. Remove from heat. Add 1 cup rice; mix.

3. Preheat oven to 350º Spray a 9x13-inch baking dish with nonstick spray.

4. Spread the vegetable and rice mixture in baking pan, then top with remaining rice. Sprinkle with nuts and raisins. Cover with foil; bake 30 minutes.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories: 183 Fat: 5 g % fat calories: 26 Cholesterol: 0 mg Carbohydrate: 31 g Protein: 4 g

Rice PuddingAlmond Rice Pudding with Dried Cherries
Serves 8


Traditional rice pudding has a long history in both Great Britain and the United States. This uniquely flavored dessert is also very low in fat.

Prep Time: 15 Minutes
Cooking Time: 50 Minutes


1 1/3 cups nonfat milk
1 teaspoon almond extract
1 egg
1 egg white
1/2 cup brown sugar or 1/4 cup honey
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon butter, melted
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/2 cup dried cherries
2 cups short-grain cooked rice

1. Preheat oven to 325º Lightly grease a baking dish with lid (or use individual ramekins).

2. Combine milk, almond extract, eggs, sugar, salt, butter and lemon juice. Beat well. Add cherries and rice; stir to combine. Pour mixture into baking dish.

3. Cover and bake until set, about 45­50 minutes.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories: 152 Fat: 3 g % fat calories: 15 Cholesterol: 31 mg Carbohydrate: 29 g Protein: 4 g

Patti Bess is the author of Vegetarian Barbecue (Lowell House). Elisa Bosley is associate editor for Delicious!
 

Photography by: Laurie Smith