Save The Bros Organic Valley

6 of the best natural food and beverage commercials

Our favorite inspiring, funny and catchy video ads from the natural products industry.

Here’s a roundup of our favorite commercials produced over the years by food and beverage brands that effectively (and sometimes hilariously) communicate how their ingredients, practices and businesses are different. Some of these videos made it to prime-time television spots. Some lived only on the internet. But all gave potential shoppers a deeper understanding of natural industry values that range from sustainable farming to plant-based eating. Give them a watch!

Silk's "Do Plants"

In this fun and fast-paced commercial, the wildly popular DJ Khaled—who often posts about his vegan meals on social media—encourages viewers to drink plant milks as a form of rebellion. "They don't want us to do plants," he says. Khaled chugs a glass of milk alternative. "So what we going do? Silk!" The video also shows how Silk's products can be used in myriad ways—from culinary uses to pouring over morning breakfast cereals.

Soylent's "Use Less. Do More."

This quirky, cute commercial communicates Soylent's attractive message to be more productive by using fewer resources, which in this case, is drinking Soylent instead of eating food—messaging that reminds us of a certain dystopian movie in which people eat, um, people for nutrition. But this wonderful video features a downed pilot on a deserted island who, through sheer ingenuity and a few swigs of Soylent, uses an airplane blade to build an adorable A-frame cottage, fire-up a radio, rally his family to come join him and order more Soylent from a scuba delivery man. We still aren't quite sold on Soylent, but this ad helps us understand how the product could fit into a busy lifestyle.

Annie's "The Story of Annie's"

Designed by the creative agency Bellshop, this illustrated spot is a bright animation that communicates Annie’s commitment to craft kid-friendly options without the added sugar, artificial flavors or synthetic ingredients. “Thirty years ago, kids ate what was yummy and moms didn't say no," says the narrator, over depictions of dancing macaroni and cookies. “Then, parents got curious about what was inside, and away those foods went, with fake flavors and dyes. That’s when Annie’s stepped in.” The spot concludes with a watering can cleaning the artificial colors off of happy-looking pasta.

Organic Valley's "Save The Bros"

This hilarious commercial produced by Organic Valley pokes fun at a marginalized demographic who "consumes two thirds of our nation's light beer and 100 percent of our Axe body spray." In an effort to shine light on their new USDA Organic protein shakes, Organic Valley launched this deadpan PSA to "Save The Bros" from protein drinks that contain artificial flavors, colors and preservatives. "Our bros are in trouble. Learn how you can help save our beloved Bromo Sapiens from chugging toxic chemical junk found in their favorite food source: protein shakes," reads the video description. The parody worked. To date, this video has received 4.2 million views!

 Chipotle's "Back To The Start"

One of Chipotle's most successful ad campaigns ever, this somewhat dark, somewhat inspirational commercial aired during the 2012 Grammy's on national TV and depicts how, through conscious sourcing, Chipotle "cultivates a better world" by prioritizing farmers that use sustainable and humane practices.

Andy Boy Broccoli Rabe's "Fuel Your Body"

It's rare that vegetables get any kind of marketing, aside from a beautiful grocery display in the produce section. So when a veggie as obscure as broccoli rabe gets a commercial, we're interested. Funded by California-based vegetable grower Andy Boy, the ad features Candice Kumai, a clean-eating chef with several cookbooks to her name. According to the video, Kumai likes to stay fit via jumping rope, cycling, boxing and whirring broccoli rabe into smoothies, sautées and more. Broccoli rabe for the win!

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