Stonyfield partners with 'Parks and Recreation' actor to eliminate public pesticide use

Stonyfield wants to expand organic practices beyond the farm.
 

Since the early 1980s, Stonyfield has been a stalwart champion of organic agriculture. That delicious yogurt you can find in grocery stores across the United States? It was initially created as a way for founders Gary Hirshberg and Samuel Kaymen to raise funds for their organic farming school based in New Hampshire. Now, with 200,000 organic acres in production and thousands of dairy cows tended to by dedicated farmers, Stonyfield is turning its attention to a different kind of field in dire need of organic practices: our public parks.

The yogurt brand’s new campaign, adorably named the StonyFIELDS Initiative, is designed to raise awareness about pesticide application on parks and fields where people recreate, and to provide resources for communities across the country to transition to organic field management. Stonyfield will be offering 35 communities across the U.S. expert resources and funding to support the move toward organic. Plus, two donation programs—one for towns that need help accelerating organic grounds management and one for nonprofits pushing their city governments toward organic—will provide further resources and funds. This cheeky video, hosted by Parks and Recreation actor Adam Scott, explains why pesticides on public fields where children play is problematic. 

At first glance, it may seem strange that a yogurt company is tackling an issue like grounds management. But as lessening pesticides such as glyphosate and dicamba are of increasing importance to American parents, and considering that wellness requires both healthy food and healthy recreation, the campaign is well-aligned with Stonyfield’s mission. Plus, it's a reminder that widening organic acreage needn’t just be limited to farms.

Watch the above video and click here to learn more.

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