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5@5: Entrepreneurs, think like a farmer | Millet poised for a comeback in key countries

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top food and supplement headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

A startup founder worth $15 million explains why entrepreneurs should think like farmers, not suits

The cofounder and CEO of G2 Crowd traded in farm life for the tech industry years ago but says he learned many valuable lessons in agriculture that apply to his life as an entrepreneur. Farming taught him the importance of setting aside time to rest and recover, making the most efficient use of time and trusting the long-term vision. Read more at Quartz...

 

A forgotten group of grains might help Indian farmers—and improve diets, too

Several decades ago, millet was commonly eaten across India. But since then, more water-intensive grains like rice and wheat have gained favor. Now, faced with a water crisis, many states are looking for more sustainable ways to farm. Millet is one potential solution, and its nutritional qualities make it especially appealing. Read more at NPR...

 

Chicken farmers say processors treat them like servants

Former chicken farmers in Alabama, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Texas have filed a federal lawsuit accusing some of the largest poultry processors, including Tyson Foods and Perdue Farms, of pushing them into debt by requiring them to build modern chicken barns and fixing prices at low levels. Read more at Associated Press...

 

Willy Street Co-op to dispense organic produce prescriptions

A new program in Madison, Wisconsin, allows doctors to prescribe organic fruits and vegetables to patients and qualify for aid if their doctor deems they aren't food secure. It's a partnership between the local co-op and UW Health Northeast Family Medical, which is a block away. Read more at The Gourmet Retailer...

 

Vermont's new lieutenant governor is a veggie-growing progressive

David Zuckerman has been an organic farmer for more than 20 years and was just sworn in as Vermont's lieutenant governor. Here, he has an opportunity to further sustainable food policy. Read more at Civil Eats...

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