Back to the Roots organic cereals

[email protected]: NYC school breakfasts get an organic boost | Restaurant-grocery store lines continue to blur

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top food and supplement headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

Healthier cereals snare a spot on New York school menus

A small natural products company scored a huge victory in a new partnership with the New York City public school system that will bring simple, more nutritious cereal options to children through the system's free breakfast program. When Kellogg's discontinued two varieties of Kashi cereal that the school district served to students, it ran taste tests to identify a replacement. Surprisingly, it found a hit in Back to the Roots' Biodynamic Cinnamon Clusters and its Purple Corn Flakes, which contain three ingredients and have 5 grams of sugar, 4 grams of protein and 3 grams of fiber per serving—and also turn the milk purple, which the kids liked. Although the cereals cost more than the Kellogg's varieties the district used to purchase, the chief executive of the Office of School Support Services says it's more than offset by their popularity among students, organic ingredients and lower sugar content. Read more at The New York Times...

 

The rise of the grocerant

In some grocery stores, the prepared food sections are evolving to look more like full-service or semi-service restaurants with wifi and made-to-order meals, in an effort to keep customers lingering and to offer them a better culinary experience. The trend is being driven by millennials, analysts say, and competition will continue to drive experimentation. Read more at Eater...

 

The beauty and horror of 'grocerants'

OK, so more grocery stores are serving prepared foods, but is the food they're serving safe? Some food safety experts note an uptick in incidences of food poisoning cases from grocery prepared foods. Read more at Mother Jones...

 

Retailers assist shoppers with food allergies

Different colored shelf tags, in-store education, dietitians, websites and doing everything they can to avoid potential cross-contact of products are just some of the way grocers are working to help shoppers avoid allergens. Read more at Supermarket News...

 

Our organic products will get cheaper with local production: Irwin Simon, founder, Hain Celestial

In India, where organic products are "barely noticeable on retail shelves," Hain Celestial Group has struck a deal for food company Future Consumer to manufacture and sell its food. Read more at Economic Times...

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