NBJ
What we know 1 year later from Amazon buying Whole Foods

Amazon bought Whole Foods: What's changed one year later

How has the market changed since Amazon purchased Whole Foods, and what can we expect for the future?

The fact that the deal wasn’t entirely unexpected didn’t make the news that Amazon was buying Whole Foods any less titanic for the natural products industry. Analysts, insiders and industry veterans all called the acquisition something that would ripple across categories and channels. But a year later, it’s tempting to ask what the fuss was about.

Brick and mortar grocery is still exponentially larger than online orders. Lucky’s Market has ambitious expansion plans. Natural Grocers is still opening new stores. We haven’t seen any kombucha-by-drone delivery. Of course, it’s far too early to see how large an impact the deal will have on distribution and new product launches, but sales growth and consumer research could say a lot about how the omnichannel landscape, beyond and including Amazon, will develop. 

Against that uncertainty, data and proprietary research from a consumer survey included in the new NBJ Sales Channel Report could be pivotal. The report features more than 100 charts and tables on sales for food and beverage, dietary supplements and natural living products across brick and mortar, e-commerce, multilevel marketing and other channels that include practitioners and farmers markets.

A year ago, the results of the Amazon/Whole Foods deal were still entirely theoretical. Predictions now can be based on real data, much of which can be found in the NBJ report. Email Cindy at [email protected] for more details on the data and insights to be gleaned from the report, and how it can position your brand in uncertain times. 

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